Wild Flower arranging is where it’s at…

So last year I never planted any flowers and then I couldn’t believe it when no flowers grew. This year I knew better so I scattered wild flower seeds like there was no tomorrow and now: Badabing! Flowers everywhere for the past two months! Hundreds of butterflies, billions of bees. It’s absolutely gorgeous.
I love having flowers in the house but don’t like the air miles that most clock up so this is the perfect solution.
I’ve been arranging bunches all summer so here’s some tips from my Housewifes Handbook (actually quite a good book.)
  1. Cut flowers in the morning before the dew has dried, or in the early evening.
  2. Cut them using a sharp bladed knife or scissors or else you’ll blunt the stem
  3. Place them all in a bucket of luke warm water for a few hours before arranging them
  4. Strip off any leaves that will be below the water line
  5. I always start by putting the greenery in first and building a frame. Then sticking in the ‘filler’ flowers, then the gorgeous big ones that will stand out. The damn book has no tips on actually arranging them.
  6. Keep flowers in a draught free area, out of direct sunlight and not near a fruit bowl as fruit produces ethylene gas which ripens fruit but ages flowers.
  7. Change the water every few days. Tada!
    I’m not even sure what the wild flower mix had in it but so far I see tons of marigolds, sunflowers, dark purple poppies, borage, cornflowers, sweet pea and loads of other pretty stuff.  I stick some lavender in with most of the posies just because it smells nice and I also use some herbs like sage leaves! I read that somewhere but can’t remember, it makes perfect sense though. Especially for flowers that will be on the kitchen table. So now you know what all the cool kids are up to nowadays; flower arranging.
    Lilly x
    This entry was posted in Make. Bookmark the permalink.

    9 Responses to Wild Flower arranging is where it’s at…

    1. mise says:

      Not near the fruit! That’s where I’ve been going wrong all my life. Your wildflowers are very charming – they look beautiful as a mixed bunch, whereas mixed cultivated bouquets just look busy. If I lived near you I’d save some air-miles by creeping into your garden to steal some flowers when you’d popped out to the shops.

    2. pauljkiernan says:

      There’s a good book called “Guilding The Lilly” (written by the sister of The Irish Times’ garden writer, Jane Power) on the cut flower industry. Air miles is only one of many sins associated with this sector!

    3. Ha! Thanks Mise! I know I mix up the yellows & blues etc. but it seems to work, thaaaank god. Next Spring I’ll have to do a wild flower seed giveaway! x

    4. Jess says:

      Absolutely stunning! These are so pretty, I am so jealous.

    5. Oh? I usually refer to guilding the Lilly when I put too much make up on, ha! I’ll look it up.Thanks Paul!

    6. Beautiful flowers Lilly! I love wild flowers and have always fancied having one of those pretty wild English gardens…but here obviously :) Great tips.

    7. Amanda says:

      What a treat to be able to whip outside and pick so many beautiful flowers. They look so gorgeous!

    8. Lily, I love this post!! We are currently designing our garden and so often I have thought about throwing caution to the wind and just sprinkling wild flower seeds everywhere! Perhaps, we can have a little wild flower garden…after reading this post I think it shall happen. Also, I love that Housewife book..I have it as well (and not one bit ashamed!) x

    9. Lori ann says:

      Gorgeous! I LOVE wildflowers, yours are so so lovely. I am curious about the book, and will go check our Amazon to see if its available here in the U.S.
      I love this post! thank you for sharing. :)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>